Calculations | Volume, Weight Calculation

Air Freight

VOLUME.WEIGHT CALCULATION
GENERAL.CARGO IN CMS
L x B x H x No.Ctns
————————
6000
= Vol.Weight
GENERAL.CARGO IN INCH
L x B x H x No.Ctns
————————
366
= Vol.Weight

Ocean Freight

VOLUME.WEIGHT CALCULATION
IF DIMENSION IN CENTIMETERS
L x B x H x No.Ctns
————————
1,000,000
= CBM(M3)
IF DIMENSION IN INCHES
L x B x H x No.Ctns
————————
1728
= X
——–
35.315
= CBM(M3)
Ocean Freight | Internationally Accepted Container Specifications
Type of Container Interior Dimension Door Opening Top Opening Tare Weight Cubic Capacity Payload
20′ Dry Freight Container L:5.919 mm
W:2,340 mm
H:2,380 mm
W:2,286 mm
H:2,278 mm
1,900 kg
4,189 lbs
  1. 0cbm,
    1,165 cu-tt
22,100 kg
48,721 lbs
40′ Dry Freight Container L:12,045mm
W:2,309 mm
H:2,379 mm
W:8,280 mm
H:2,278 mm
3,084kg
6,799lbs
  1. 0cbm
    2,330cu.ft.
27,396kg
60,397lbs
40′ High Cube Dry
Container
L:12,056mm
W:2,347 mm
H:2,690 mm
W:2,340 mm
H:2,585 mm
2,900kg
6.393 lbs
76.0cbm
2.684cu.fl.
29,600kg
65.256 lbs
45′ High Cube Dry Container L:13,582mm
W:2,347 mm
H:2,690 mm
W:2,340 mm
H:2,585 mm
3.900kg
8.598lbs
86cbm
3,037cu.tt
28.600kg
63,256lbs
20′ Reefer Container L:5,428mm
W:2,266 mm
H:2,240 mm
W:2,28Gmm
H:2,118 mm
2.940kg
6,482lbs
27.5cbm
971cu.ft.
24,064kg
53,G43lbs
40′ ReeferContainer L:11,207mm
W:2,246 mm
H-2.183 mm
W:2,21mm
H:2,118 mm
4,840kg
10.670lbs
55cbm
1.942cu.ft.
25,640kg
56.526lbs
40′ High Cube ReeferContainer L:11,628mm
W:2,294 mm
H-2.509 mm
W:2,290mm
H:2,535 mm
4,430kg
8,766lba
67cbm
2,366cu.ft
28,070kg
61,883lbs
45′ High Cube Reefer Container L:13,102mm
W:2,294 mm
H-2.509 mm
W:2,290mm
H:2,535 mm
5.200kg
11,464lbs
75cbm
2,650cu.ft-
27,300kg
60,186lbs
20′ Open Top Container   L:5,919mm
W:2340 mm
H-2.286 mm
 W:2,286mm
H:2,551 mm
 L:5,425mm
W:2,222mm
 2,174kg
4,793lbs
 32-5cbm
1,147cu.ft-
 21,826kg
4B,117lbs
40′ Open Top Container L:12,043mm
W:2,340 mm
H-2,272 mm
W:2,279mm
H:2,278 mm
L:11,585mm
W:2,162mm
4,300kg
9.480lbs
64.0cbm
2,260cu.ft.
26.181kg
57,720lbs
20′ Flat Rack Container L:5,662mm
W:2,438 mm
H-2,327 mm
2,530kg
5,578lbs
21,470kg
47,333lbs
40′ Flat Rack Container L:12,080mm
W:2,438 mm
H.2.103 mm
5.480kg
12,081lbs
25,000kg
55,115lbs

 

 

Air Freight | LD11 ALP, LD3 AKE, LD11 ALP
LD11 ALP
Compatible aircraft: Boeing 747-400 Boeing 777 Boeing 747-400F Boeing 747-200F
Volume: 240 cu.ft. (6.8cu.m.)
Tare Weight: 185kg/407lbs
Max Gross Weight: 747: 3176kg/6987lbs
External Dimensions: 60.4″ x 64″ x 125″
Wide body aircraft. ALP: Full width lower deck container.
LD3 AKE
Compatible aircraft: Boeing 747-400 Boeing 767 Boeing 777 Boeing 747-400F Boeing 747-200F MD11F
Volume: 150 cu.ft. (4.2cu.m.)
Tare Weight: 72kg/158lbs
Max Gross Weight: 1588kg/3493lbs
External Dimensions: 79″ x 43″ x 64″ x 61.5″ x 60.4″
Wide body aircraft. Half width lower deck container.
LD11 ALP
Compatible aircraft: Boeing 747-400 Boeing 767 Boeing 777 Boeing 747-400F Boeing 747-200F MD11F
Volume: 350 cu.ft. (10.0cu.m.)
Tare Weight: 200kg/440lbs
Max Gross Weight: 747: 6033kg/13300lbs
777: 4626kg/10501lbs
External Dimensions: 88″ x 62″ x 125″
Wide body aircraft. Full width lower deck container.
EXW {+ the named place}

Ex Works

Ex means from. Works means factory, mill or warehouse, which is the seller’s premises. EXW applies to goods available only at the seller’s premises. Buyer is responsible for loading the goods on truck or container at the seller’s premises, and for the subsequent costs and risks. In practice, it is not uncommon that the seller loads the goods on truck or container at the seller’s premises without charging loading fee. In the quotation, indicate the named place (seller’s premises) after the acronym EXW, for example EXW Kobe and EXW San Antonio. The term EXW is commonly used between the manufacturer (seller) and export-trader (buyer), and the export-trader resells on other trade terms to the foreign buyers. Some manufacturers may use the term Ex Factory, which means the same as Ex Works.

FCA {+ the named point of departure}
Free Carrier The delivery of goods on truck, rail car or container at the specified point (depot) of departure, which is usually the seller’s premises, or a named railroad station or a named cargo terminal or into the custody of the carrier, at seller’s expense. The point (depot) at origin may or may not be a customs clearance center. Buyer is responsible for the main carriage/freight, cargo insurance and other costs and risks. In the air shipment, technically speaking, goods placed in the custody of an air carrier is considered as delivery on board the plane. In practice, many importers and exporters still use the term FOB in the air shipment. The term FCA is also used in the RO/RO (roll on/roll off) services. In the export quotation, indicate the point of departure (loading) after the acronym FCA, for example FCA Hong Kong and FCA Seattle. Some manufacturers may use the former terms FOT (Free On Truck) and FOR (Free On Rail) in selling to export-traders.
FAS {+ the named port of origin}

Free Alongside Ship

Goods are placed in the dock shed or at the side of the ship, on the dock or lighter, within reach of its loading equipment so that they can be loaded aboard the ship, at seller’s expense. Buyer is responsible for the loading fee, main carriage/freight, cargo insurance, and other costs and risks.

In the export quotation, indicate the port of origin (loading) after the acronym FAS, for example FAS New York and FAS Bremen.

The FAS term is popular in the break-bulk shipments and with the importing countries using their own vessels.

FOB {+ the named port of origin}

Free On Board

The delivery of goods on board the vessel at the named port of origin (loading), at seller’s expense. Buyer is responsible for the main carriage/freight, cargo insurance and other costs and risks.

In the export quotation, indicate the port of origin (loading) after the acronym FOB, for example FOB Vancouver and FOB Shanghai.

Under the rules of the INCOTERMS 1990, the term FOB is used for ocean freight only. However, in practice, many importers and exporters still use the term FOB in the air freight.

In North America, the term FOB has other applications. Many buyers and sellers in Canada and the U.S.A. dealing on the open account and consignment basis are accustomed to using the shipping terms FOB Origin and FOB Destination.

FOB Origin means the buyer is responsible for the freight and other costs and risks.

FOB Destination means the seller is responsible for the freight and other costs and risks until the goods are delivered to the buyer’s premises, which may include the import customs clearance and payment of import customs duties and taxes at the buyer’s country, depending on the agreement between the buyer and seller.

In international trade, avoid using the shipping terms FOB Origin and FOB Destination, which are not part of the INCOTERMS (International Commercial Terms).

CFR {+ the named port of destination}

Cost and Freight

The delivery of goods to the named port of destination (discharge) at the seller’s expense. Buyer is responsible for the cargo insurance and other costs and risks. The term CFR was formerly written as C&F. Many importers and exporters worldwide still use the term C&F.

In the export quotation, indicate the port of destination (discharge) after the acronym CFR, for example CFR Karachi and CFR Alexandria.

Under the rules of the INCOTERMS 1990, the term Cost and Freight is used for ocean freight only. However, in practice, the term Cost and Freight (C&F) is still commonly used in the air freight.

CIF {+ the named port of destination}

Cost, Insurance and Freight

The cargo insurance and delivery of goods to the named port of destination (discharge) at the seller’s expense. Buyer is responsible for the import customs clearance and other costs and risks.

In the export quotation, indicate the port of destination (discharge) after the acronym CIF, for example CIF Pusan and CIF Singapore.

Under the rules of the INCOTERMS 1990, the term CIF is used for ocean freight only. However, in practice, many importers and exporters still use the term CIF in the air freight.

CPT {+ the named place of destination}

Carriage Paid To

The delivery of goods to the named place of destination (discharge) at seller’s expense. Buyer assumes the cargo insurance, import customs clearance, payment of customs duties and taxes, and other costs and risks.

In the export quotation, indicate the place of destination (discharge) after the acronym CPT, for example CPT Los Angeles and CPT Osaka.

CIP {+ the named place of destination}

Carriage and Insurance Paid To

The delivery of goods and the cargo insurance to the named place of destination (discharge) at seller’s expense. Buyer assumes the import customs clearance, payment of customs duties and taxes, and other costs and risks.

In the export quotation, indicate the place of destination (discharge) after the acronym CIP, for example CIP Paris and CIP Athens.

DAF {+ the named point at frontier}

Delivered At Frontier

The delivery of goods to the specified point at the frontier at seller’s expense. Buyer is responsible for the import customs clearance, payment of customs duties and taxes, and other costs and risks.

In the export quotation, indicate the point at frontier (discharge) after the acronym DAF, for example DAF Buffalo and DAF Welland.

DES {+ the named port of destination}

Delivered Ex Ship

The delivery of goods on board the vessel at the named port of destination (discharge), at seller’s expense. Buyer assumes the unloading fee, import customs clearance, payment of customs duties and taxes, cargo insurance, and other costs and risks.

In the export quotation, indicate the port of destination (discharge) after the acronym DES, for example DES Helsinki and DES Stockholm.

DEQ {+ the named port of destination}

Delivered Ex Quay

TThe delivery of goods to the quay (the port) at destination at seller’s expense. Seller is responsible for the import customs clearance and payment of customs duties and taxes at the buyer’s end. Buyer assumes the cargo insurance and other costs and risks.

In the export quotation, indicate the port of destination (discharge) after the acronym DEQ, for example DEQ Libreville and DEQ Maputo.

DDU {+ the named point of destination}

Delivered Duty Unpaid

TThe delivery of goods and the cargo insurance to the final point at destination, which is often the project site or buyer’s premises, at seller’s expense. Buyer assumes the import customs clearance and payment of customs duties and taxes. The seller may opt not to insure the goods at his/her own risks.

In the export quotation, indicate the point of destination (discharge) after the acronym DDU, for example DDU La Paz and DDU Ndjamena.

DDP {+ the named point of destination}

Delivered Duty Paid

The seller is responsible for most of the expenses, which include the cargo insurance, import customs clearance, and payment of customs duties and taxes at the buyer’s end, and the delivery of goods to the final point at destination, which is often the project site or buyer’s premises. The seller may opt not to insure the goods at his/her own risks.

In the export quotation, indicate the point of destination (discharge) after the acronym DDP, for example DDP Bujumbura and DDP Mbabane